The modulators section provides controls to modulate the pitch, filter cutoff frequency, PWM and amplitude of the oscillators with an LFO and two dedicated ADSR envelope generators, as well as set their mode of operation and their various parameters.

Pulverisateur modulators section
Figure 7.6.3: The Pulverisateur's modulators section.

  1. Wave: This knobs set the shape of the waveform produced by the LFO. Click the waveform icons to set it to sample and hold (random), a sine wave, a triangle wave, a sawtooth wave (ramp up) or a square wave. Drag the knob to smoothly interpolate between two consecutive waveforms.
  2. Rate: This knob sets the frequency of oscillation of the LFO in Hz or fractions of a bar. When the “Sync” switch is on, the frequency ranges from 8 bars per cycle at minimum to 1/128 of a bar (a 128th note) per cycle at maximum. When the “Sync” switch is off, the frequency ranges from 0,01 Hz (a period of 1 minute and 40 seconds) at minimum to 344 Hz (a period of 2,9 milliseconds) at maximum. Note: At the highest frequency, the LFO signal might exhibit aliasing.
  3. Sync: This switch synchronizes the frequency of oscillation of the LFO to the arrangement’s tempo and lets you change it in discrete fractions of the time signature. When this switch is off, the frequency is set in Hz and you can change it continuously. Note: In this mode, the LFO is free running, therefore its phase at the beginning of playback is undefined.
  4. Trigger: This switch sets the wave of the LFO to start its cycle again at the beginning of each note. When this switch is off, new notes don’t interrupt the wave cycle.
  5. Destination: These switches set the LFO’s signal to modulate the pitch of oscillator one, two and three, the cutoff frequency of the filter and the PWM of all oscillators respectively. Note: If the LFO’s waveform is set to a square wave, the PWM remains constant and the “Rate” knob has no effect.
  6. Depth: This knob sets the amount by which the LFO’s signal modulates the destinations set above. Its range is a percentage of one octave above and below for pitch, the filter’s frequency range for filter and the pulse width for PWM. It goes from full negative modulation at minimum through no modulation at center to full positive modulation at maximum. Note: When you use negative modulation, you effectively invert the waveform of the LFO.
  7. Attack: These knobs set the attack time of the filter and amplitude envelopes respectively in milliseconds, from 1 millisecond at minimum to 5 seconds at maximum. Note: The rate of attack follows a subtle logarithmic curve.
  8. Decay: These knobs set the decay time of the filter and amplitude envelopes respectively in milliseconds from 1 millisecond at minimum to 5 seconds at maximum. Note: The rate of decay follows a subtle exponential curve.
  9. Loop: These switches cause the decay phase of the filter and amplitude envelopes respectively to repeat in a ping-pong fashion until the start of the release phase.
  10. Sustain: These knobs set the sustain level of the filter and amplitude envelopes as a percentage of the filter’s frequency range or the total amplitude respectively.
  11. Release: These knobs set the release time of the filter and amplitude envelopes respectively in milliseconds, from 1 millisecond at minimum to 20 seconds at maximum. Note: The rate of release follows a subtle exponential curve.
  12. Amount: This knob sets the amount by which the filter envelope modulates the filter cutoff frequency as a percentage of the filter’s frequency range from full negative modulation at minimum through no modulation at center to full positive modulation at maximum. Note: When you use negative modulation, you effectively invert the shape of the filter envelope.

Feedback

Was this helpful?

Yes No
You indicated this topic was not helpful to you ...
Could you please leave a comment telling us why? Thank you!
Thanks for your feedback.

Post your comment on this topic.

Post Comment