The envelopes section provides controls to set the parameters and mode of operation of each of the Heisenberg’s four ADSR envelopes. The first three envelopes can modulate the amplitude of each operator and the filter cutoff frequency. A dedicated fourth envelope can modulate the pitch of each operator.

Heisenberg envelopes section
Figure 7.9.3a: The Heisenberg's envelopes section.

  1. Envelope: This selector sets one of the four envelopes for editing in the envelope display below.
  2. Attack time: This slider sets the attack time of the selected envelope in milliseconds or fractions of a bar. When the sync switch is on, the time ranges from 1/256 of a bar (a 256th note) at minimum to 4 bars at maximum. When the sync switch is off, the time ranges from 1 millisecond at minimum to 10 seconds at maximum.
  3. Attack bend: This slider sets the rate of increase in amplitude or pitch shift during the attack phase of the selected envelope from exponential at minimum through linear at center to logarithmic at maximum.
  4. Decay time: This slider sets the decay time of the selected envelope in milliseconds or fractions of a bar. When the sync switch is on, the time ranges from 1/256 of a bar (a 256th note) at minimum to 4 bars at maximum. When the sync switch is off, the time ranges from 1 millisecond at minimum to 10 seconds at maximum.
  5. Decay bend: This slider sets the rate of decrease of amplitude or pitch shift during the decay phase of the selected envelope from logarithmic at minimum through linear at center to exponential at maximum.
  6. Sustain level: This slider sets the sustain level of the selected envelope as a percentage of the total amplitude or pitch range.
  7. Release time: This slider sets the release time of the selected envelope in milliseconds or fractions of a bar. When the sync switch is on, the time ranges from 1/256 of a bar (a 256th note) per cycle at minimum to 4 bars per cycle at maximum. When the sync switch is off, the time ranges from 1 millisecond at minimum to 10 seconds at maximum.
  8. Release bend: This slider sets the rate of decrease of amplitude or pitch shift during the release phase of the selected envelope from logarithmic at minimum through linear at center to exponential at maximum.
  9. Sync: This switch synchronizes the attack, decay and release times of each envelope to the arrangement’s tempo and lets you change them in discrete fractions of the time signature. When this switch is off, those times are set in milliseconds and you can change them continuously.
  10. Decay loop: This selector causes the decay phase of the selected envelope to repeat in a ping-pong fashion until the start of the release phase. For the pitch envelope only, the infinity option causes the decay phase to repeat indefinitely, also during the release phase.

Heisenberg pitch envelope section
Figure 7.9.3b: The Heisenberg's pitch envelope.

  1. Attack pitch: This slider sets the shift in pitch at the start of the attack phase of the pitch envelope within the range defined by the semitones control from full negative range at minimum to full positive range at maximum.
  2. Decay pitch: This slider sets the shift in pitch at the start of the decay phase of the pitch envelope within the range defined by the semitones control from full negative range at minimum to full positive range at maximum.
  3. Sustain pitch: This slider sets the shift in pitch during the sustain phase of the pitch envelope within the range defined by the semitones control from full negative range at minimum to full positive range at maximum.
  4. Release pitch: This slider sets the shift in pitch at the end of the release phase of the pitch envelope within the range defined by the semitones control from full negative range at minimum to full positive range at maximum. Note: Make sure that the amplitude release time is long enough to hear the release pitch shift.
  5. Semitones: This slider sets the maximum range of pitch shift for the “Attack”, “Decay”, “Sustain” and “Release” pitch sliders in semitones, from 1 semitone at minimum to 36 semitones, or 3 octaves, at maximum.

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